Friday, June 20, 2014

Well Behaved Women Seldom Make History

That title quote is by author,  Laurel Thatcher Ulrich.
In this case, it fits ever so perfectly!
 These "women" are Amelia Earhart and Marie Curie.
I kid you not.  
I named them as tiny chicks, not knowing what breed they were or what behavior I could expect from them.
These girls are no more well behaved than the real Amelia and Marie were in their time.
They do things considered too bold and brash for polite, rule-following society.

 These girls have their morning breakfast when I let them out of the coop and then they make plans that do not include being 'good girls' by staying within the safety of the chicken run with the other hens.
They "fly the coop", as it were.

They are Sicilian Buttercup chickens and are well able to fly to just about any perch they wish.
Amelia finds my shoulder a fine landing spot to check me for ticks and fleas.


Unfortunately, I am drawn to them and they to me.
They are so friendly and curious.
They are my favorites.

I fear for their safety, just as those that loved Amelia Earhart and Marie Curie did.
Being out of the confines of the chicken run leaves them more open to predation by hawks and marauding dogs.

But, just like Amelia and Marie, they must be free to do as their heart and will demands.
These young hens cannot be held down; nor do I desire to keep them confined when it is clear they want otherwise.
They stay close by the chicken run and the other hens, but wish to do greater things than peck around with those that follow the rules too closely.

My only hope is that they do not "make history" by getting killed.


8 comments:

  1. They're beautiful. I love the pattern on their backs. Seeing them staying so close to one another and slightly away from the other hens makes me think of the old saying about birds of a feather. If they could not 'fly the coop' I wonder if they'd stay so close together or mingle with the others.

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    1. They mingle well with the other hens once I let them all out about 4pm for some free ranging. Oddly enough, my hens have always segregated to their own breed. I wish I knew what that was about.

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  2. I hope so also...I so do.

    Linda
    http://coloradofarmlife.wordpress.com

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    1. They are such adorable little birds. I almost want to bring them in the house for prolonged visits. Wouldn't Hobbes just be thrilled? :D

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  3. They are so pretty. I would hate to see anything happen totem. But they must be free to pursue their hearts desire and that is what they are doing.

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    1. With my chickens, I have learned that worrying too much about them is just futile. I always hate when something bad happens to one---which is hardly ever---but I realize they can only be protected so much.

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  4. Are you SURE Their mama wasn't seduced by a sage grouse? I'm jealous of your spunky feathered friends.

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    1. They do look a quite a bit like a Sage grouse, don't they? Maybe the hatchery has a secret that they aren't sharing. :)

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