Wednesday, June 25, 2008

Garden Notes

I spent some time in the relative coolness of the morning, checking out how my gardens are taking the extreme heat we've been having.  I think "not well" would be my take on things. Everything looks stressed, but most of it is hanging in there. 
Don't forget to click on the pictures that you'd like to see better.
I think the mystery of 'what kind of volunteer winter squash is this?'  is solved.  It's beginning to look very much like a butternut squash, despite it's green coloring. This plant is working very hard to stay alive.  I think the two squash you see will be all I get.  Oh well, that's two more than I planned for and I love butternut squash.
Another volunteer.  A sweet potato under my tomatoes.  It's the plant directly in front of the the blue pot.  You also see plenty of volunteer weeds. :) 
Pomegranate triplets.  Normally, the tree would have expelled two of them.  They are far from ripe, so anything could happen.  The poor little tree is loaded with fruit.  A bounty for us, a burden for the tree.
Morning Glories in all their glory.  

More volunteers.  
The purple flower is a Violet Ruellia.  If you ever have the chance to plant this---don't.  I didn't plant it, it is native.  It is also extremely invasive and very, very deep rooted.  It cannot be pulled up, even in very wet soil.  It has a cool way of spreading though---the seed pods explode when hit by water droplets.  It took me the longest time to figure out what 'that noise' was once when I was working in the veggie garden.  I kept hearing what sounded like electrical popping and wondered if the sprinkler system in the other bed was having a problem.  I got nearer and was hit with ruellia seeds.  I've decided since they have flowers, that they can stay.  
My poor husband puts up with this practice quite often.  The tall plant next to the ruellia is also a native volunteer.  It's called Snow on the Mountain.  In about a month, the tips of each branch will be covered in large clusters of white flowers that smell heavenly.  Lee says, "Just because it flowers, doesn't mean it should stay."  These volunteers were lucky enough to set up camp in my flower bed.  If they manage to start growing in the lawn, then all bets are off and Lee is free to do as he pleases.

4 comments:

  1. Butternut squash! They're beautiful!! How do you cook them, CeeCee? I've never been much of a squash fan, other than zucchini, which I love, but I'd be willing to give butternut a try just because it sounds delicious! :-)
    I loved your pictures today!

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  2. Butternut squash is a hard squash. It takes a steady hand and a large knife to cut into. It's creamy, orange, and has a nutty flavor that is like a pumpkin and sweet potato, mixed together--only milder. It is best when it's halved, baked and then dressed with a little butter and brown sugar. Geez, what can't be improved with butter and brown sugar?

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  3. Butternut squash is a hard squash. It takes a steady hand and a large knife to cut into. It's creamy, orange, and has a nutty flavor that is like a pumpkin and sweet potato, mixed together--only milder. It is best when it's halved, baked and then dressed with a little butter and brown sugar. Geez, what can't be improved with butter and brown sugar?

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  4. Everything looks great!

    Butternut is my favorite winter squash. I make a soup with butternut, cream, salt, onions, nutmeg and a little chicken broth. It's rich and filling, great for cool weather.

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